52:5 Thomas Smith McClish

So far, I have concentrated on my paternal line. In the interests of not letting my mother get too jealous, today I am posting about her grandfather. Thomas Smith McClish is the son of Frederick McClish and Annie Smith. He was born in November 1894 and is a twin. He completed the 8th grade and then worked for his father and older brother on their farms. From July 1918 to July 1919, he served in the Army (American Expeditionary Forces) during the latter stages of WW1.

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52:4 John Hunter #2 (1788-1846)

I’ve previously mentioned that the Hunter family has a tradition of being stone masons. John Hunter (1813-1883) was a stone mason/brick mason as was his father and a few of his brothers. However, another interesting tidbit about this family is that there seems to be 3 straight generations of John Hunters who married women named Elizabeth. John Hunter (1813-1883) married Elizabeth Wardell. John Hunter (1788-1846) married Elisabeth Parks. And John Hunter (1760-1839) married Elizabeth Consitt. Today, here is some information on John Hunter #2 (1788-1846). 

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52:3 John Hunter

John Hunter is my 3xGreat-grandfather. He was born in Yorkshire, England and the family had a history of being stone masons.  While John listed several occupations throughout his life (he owned a mill at one point, was a farmer, and even a “publican”), his primary occupation was that of stone mason (and later, in the US, brick maker). The family immigrated in 1853 with the exception of John’s oldest son, who remained in Yorkshire. John and his family initially settled in Ohio, near several brothers of his wife, Elizabeth Wardell. Between 1857 and about 1862, the Hunter family, including grown sons, all moved to Greene County, Indiana, following their daughter Mary Hunter and her husband George Adamson. Here is the outline of John Hunter.

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GEDCOM…Why do I still have to care?

Why should I care about GEDCOM?

What is GEDCOM? The long and short of it is…a standard to transfer data between genealogy programs. Sure, some genealogy software packages have added support for importing directly from another program’s files. But not all. And not always as successfully as one might like. 

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